Category Archives: Land transport

Roller painting using cardboard rollers

Roller painting using cardboard rollers

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Themes: Under the ground, shapes, colours, five senses, hands, the sea and water ( use as a water background), transport ( wheels and things that move). This technique can be adapted to be used with many themes buy changing the colour of the paint or the shape of the paper. Example: Autumn leaves cut from orange, yellow and red rolled paper.

You will need:

  • Firm cardboard rollers
  • Paper
  • Paint – 2 or 3 colours and white
  • Teaspoons

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The children really enjoyed this activity especially the boys. I did the activity with the 4-6 year olds but with a small group and supervision the 3-4 year olds would manage this activity too. This is an excellent gross motor painting activity strengthening the fingers at the same time, It is important that you use firm cardboard rolls otherwise they will flatten when you roll them and disintegrate with the paint wetting the cardboard.

I found it worked best to drop blobs of paint on the paper using the teaspoons.

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Then roll the cylinders through the paint adding more as you need.  DSCN4829

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Be aware of your children who are excessive with paint as they tend to make the paper very wet with too much paint. Initially I thought it would be effective for the children to roll the cylinders in paint on flat plates but it was clumsy, so I switched to dropping blobs of paint instead. We were creating paper to cut seaweed for an under water display so I chose to use greens, blues and I added white which created a lovely effect of light and dark colours.

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Seaweed display using the painted paper

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Using the paper for pretend sea with plastic dolphins

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Subject: Life Skills 
Study area: Creative arts
Create in 2D
• Drawing and painting using the week’s topic
• Painting: use pre-mixed tempera paint or coloured inks or dyes in primary and secondary colours to respond to the week’s topic
•  Simple printmaking techniques to create informal pattern
•  Use colour to create pattern

Create in 3D (constructing)
• Fine-motor and sensory co-ordination: (eye-hand-mind) manipulation of scissors and other tools and equipment.
•  Encourage development of skills through manipulation of the materials

Integration: Subject: Home language
Skill: Handwriting
• Uses a range of writing tools e.g. paint brushes, wax crayons etc.
• Develops eye- hand co-ordination through play e.g. drawing and painting

 

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Sponge pictures – painting

The children had lots of fun creating art works using thin sponge cut into geometric and other shapes.
TIP: Make sure the children use plenty of glue to secure the shapes to the paper.

Here are some of their creations. The younger children just pasted the shapes in a random way while the older children created people, fish and spaceships.

        

One child decided to use the materials in a very different way! He spent ages painting and painting some more until his page and sponge shapes were completely saturated in paint. Then he ‘squeezed’ the sponge shapes and enjoyed watching the paint drip from them. Not quite what I had in mind, but a sensory activity for him which he enjoyed. He is 3 and 1/2 years old.

 

Themes: Myself, transport, space, autumn(cut leaf shapes), fish, shapes. This activity can be applied to many other themes too.

Perceptual skills:
Planning, perseverance, small muscle development, position in space

CAPS:Outcomes
Subject: Life Skills
Study area: Creative arts
Create in 2D
• Drawing and painting using the week’s topic
• Painting: use pre-mixed tempera paint or coloured inks or dyes in primary and secondary colours to respond to the week’s topic
Create in 3D (constructing)
• Fine-motor and sensory co-ordination: (eye-hand-mind) manipulation of scissors and other tools and equipment.
• Encourage development of skills through manipulation of the materials
• Create freely using a range of materials: Sponge and paint
Art elements: informal experience and use of shape in drawing and painting

Easter eggs – creative activity using bubble wrap

Bubble Wrap Easter Eggs

The 2- 3 1/2 year olds really enjoyed making these Easter eggs, but the older age group would enjoy it just as much.  There is a bit of preparation for the teacher before the lesson, but the end result is well worth the time and effort.

Preparation: Ahead of time, teacher or mom needs to cut out a coloured cardboard oval shaped frame and staple a piece of bubble wrap to the frame. (Egg shape templates are available in the Easter theme book)

Hint: It was a lot easier to cut a piece of bubble wrap larger than the egg frame, staple the bubble wrap to the frame in several places and then cut off the excess bubble wrap.

Painting: The children painted the bubble wrap (and some frames too!) Adding a squirt of dishwashing liquid helps the paint to adhere to the plastic and makes clean up easier.

Some children only wanted to pop the ‘bubbles’ but with some encouragement and a promise of a spare piece to pop once the egg was painted, all the children painted an egg for the display.

Group display

Some of the eggs were dispayed in baskets.When the eggs are displayed on a window with the light behind them, they look translucent.

Hanging the eggs as a mobile will also be effective.

Making the basket

Group activity: To make the basket, I set out some tyre track painting. We used small cars with brown paint and the children dipped the car tyres into the paint, rolled the cars over several large pieces of paper and created the ‘basket weave’ effect for the basket.

Once dry, I cut out several baskets and displayed the eggs in the baskets.

For the final display we added some of the Easter chicks around the basket.

Happy Easter.